Social media study by three IPFW professors published in Computers in Human Behavior

1-s2-0-s0747563216x00088-cov150hA study about undergraduate social media users and university social media policies by Kimberly O’Connor, assistant professor of organizational leadership and supervision; Gordon Schmidt, assistant professor of organizational leadership and supervision; and Michelle Drouin; professor of psychology, was recently published in Computers in Human Behavior.

The article, titled “Suspended because of social media? Students’ knowledge and opinions of university social media policies and practices,” examined how well students understood university policies, free speech, and privacy issues.

From the abstract:

In this exploratory study, we examined undergraduates’ (N = 298) knowledge of their university’s social media policies, understanding of free speech and privacy protections, opinions about university monitoring and discipline for personal social media posts, and perceptions of fairness regarding recent cases of student discipline for personal social media use.

The results of our study indicate that most undergraduates are highly underinformed as to whether or not their university has a social media policy, particularly if the students are early in their academic careers and do not engage in many online privacy protection behaviors. Most participants were also misinformed as to whether free speech and/or privacy protections will shield them from university discipline. In addition, most participants (78%) were opposed to the idea of universities monitoring students’ personal social media accounts, though significantly fewer (68%) were opposed to monitoring student athletes’ social media.

Finally, when asked about several recent cases involving student discipline, most participants were generally opposed to a variety of university disciplinary actions regarding students’ social media posts. We discuss these findings as they relate to the need for better social media policy training for students, as well as the potential impact on students’ academic and future careers.

Article by Augusto De Venanzi and Donna Holland published in Venezuelan Journal of Social Indicators

The article “The Application of Multidimensional Poverty Maps to High-Income Countries: A Project Proposal for Allen County, Indiana, USA,” by Augusto De Venanzi, professor of sociology, and Donna Holland, director of social research and associate professor of sociology, was recently published in Venezuelan Journal of Social Indicators.

From the abstract:

In high-income countries poverty maps are typically applied to represent concentrations of poor populations according to a single demographic variable, such as race. Notwithstanding, in low to mid-income countries these maps are used to maximum effect gradations of adverse living conditions understood as unmet basic needs. Our aim in this paper is to offer a model for the study of multidimensional poverty in high-income countries -Allen County, Indiana – that is able to capture the ways in which problems of need in housing, education, health, employment, nutrition, and environmental safety combine to produce households with joint disadvantages. We believe that multidimensional poverty maps constitute a superior way to grasp the needs of populations than single variable maps or poverty line methods. Data gathering will proceed by mailing a questionnaire to a sample of 3500 households in Allen County. Data will be processed through the application of cluster analysis and GIS mapping techniques. The presentation of these detailed estimates in the form of maps is a powerful communication tool that is readily understandable by a wide audience; further, mapping creates an important opportunity for different actors to join in the public debate on poverty.

Math professors, alumnus attend and present at Mathfest

Lowell Beineke, Jack W. Schrey professor of mathematics; Adam Coffman, acting chair and professor of mathematics; and alumnus Lingxi Wu (’16) attended Mathfest 2016, the annual summer meeting of the Mathematical Association of America, in Columbus, Ohio.

Coffman gave a talk on “Perturbing Isolated Points of Real Algebraic Space Curves.”

Wu’s talk, “Computational Mathematics and Minimizing Energy,” was based on research he did at IPFW under the supervision of Peter Dragnev, professor of mathematics.

Wu’s attendance at Mathfest was supported in part by a grant from Pi Mu Epsilon, the national mathematics honor society.

Augusto De Venanzi presents at the Forum of the International Sociological Association

Augusto De Venanzi, professor of sociology, presented at the third Forum of the International Sociological Association in Vienna, Austria, on July 10-14. His presentation was titled “Corruption and Cheating as the Tragedy of Modern Culture.”

From the abstract:

Increased political corruption, and cheating in a wide diversity of activities such as sports and academic examinations are becoming two of the most important problems affecting the life of contemporary societies.

The literature on corruption and cheating concurs in that these forms of deviance occur within the framework of particular sub-cultures that work to normalize or legitimate such practices. Some forms of corruption are accepted among political circles. Also, studies on cheating at exams show that many students justify helping friends they are close to, whereas in professional sports many athletes see “fair play” like an expression of amateurism.

Normative frameworks have been put in place to curb dishonesty such as the UN Convention Against Corruption. Severe punishment now awaits exam cheaters, and new screening techniques are used to detect doping in sports. However, beyond such disciplinary responses lies the need to acquire a deeper understanding of the cultural forces driving these harmful trends. It is my contention that the work of George Simmel on the Tragedy of Culture, which duels on the massive growth of objective cultural products, and their overwhelming impact over the subjective culture of individuals, can shed light on the problem at hand.  

Research by Richard Sutter and Tanvi Chhatiawala Published in New Book

9780128019665The paper “Population Structure Analyses using Phenetic Deciduous Tooth Trait Data from San José de Moro, Peru (A.D. 500 – 850),” co-authored by Richard Sutter, chair and professor of anthropology, and Tanvi Chhatiawala (’16) was recently published in the book Biological Distance Analysis: Forensic and Bioarchaeological Perspectives.

The paper is based upon research conducted during July 2012 as part of Sutter’s ANTH B405 Fieldwork in Bioanthropology course at the San José de Moro archaeological site located on the north coast of Peru.

The paper examines the usefulness of genetically influenced human tooth characteristics in children’s deciduous teeth to derive population genetics estimates of inbreeding, gene flow, and genetic relatedness among prehistoric human populations.

“The team compared their results to those previously reported by me in another publication that came out last fall in Current Anthropology,” said Sutter. “We found that the children’s teeth produced similar genetic estimates as did the adult’s permanent tooth traits.”

Research by Nathan Robinson and Paladino Appears in The Conversation

the-conversation-logo-for-posts-hdResearch by Nathan Robinson, post doc research assistant in biology, and Frank Paladino, chair and Jack Schrey Professor of biology, on sea turtle ‘hitchhikers’ was featured in The Conversation, a news site that focuses on bringing academic, knowledge-based journalism to the general public in an accessible way.

From the article’s introduction: Many ancient cultures once believed that the world rested on the back of a giant sea turtle. This idea might seem far-fetched today, but for a diverse range of marine organisms, it’s reality. Collectively known as epibionts, these organisms make their homes on the backs of marine animals such as crabs, whales and sea turtles. These epibionts range in size, from microscopic plants called diatoms that are just a few hundredths of a millimeter across to fish called remoras than can grow to lengths of 75 centimeters. As scientists, we are finally starting to unlock the secrets of these mysterious hitchhikers.

Screen Shot 2016-09-01 at 3.52.18 PMRobinson was also featured in a video produced by Earthwatch Institute called Securing the Future for Sea Turtles. The video focuses on the value that volunteers bring to sea turtle research around the world and offers ideas for how small changes in everyone’s daily lives can ultimately help sea turtles survive.